iOS 8 is a bit of a bummer.

September 20, 2014 — 6 Comments

iOS 8: A total bummer, but not for the reasons you might expect.  (This blog post was updated 10 minutes after posting thanks to Greg Garner and John Shoemaker. Thanks guys).

Short/TLDR version of this blog post.

Girl buys new iPad and expensive case.

Girl realizes that new iPad doesn’t have enough space for iOS8.

Girl feels old when she realizes that 16G used to be massive, but is now tiny.

Girl thinks she should refer to herself as lady or woman, now that she knows she is old.

Woman decides to refer to self as womyn.

Womyn spends hours getting new iPad 36G from Apple Store, updating 16G iPhone to iOS8 and. then. it. happens.

Womyn realizes that she is going to have to update 50 iPads at school on bad wifi.

Womyn realizes she may only have one more good year with her current set of iPad devices.

Panic. Heartache. Frustration. Fear. Sadness. Realization-of-first-world-problems. Dinner. Hope.

Womyn writes blog post.

I am not going to write here about new features. I did that this morning on Twitter.  Read Tony Vincent and TechChef4U for her blog post and Listly on features and articles.

The day 16 G became teeny tiny.

On September 8, twelve days ago at the time of this writing, I purchased a new iPad Air. I spent the extra money to go for the Air and not the Retina display. But, I couldn’t bring myself to spend another $100 for the 32G, so I settled for 16G. Plenty, yes, plenty of space. I splurged on a gorgeous case from Grovemade instead of getting a 32G. Life’s all about choices.

I only partially regret that decision.

Today, Saturday, September 20 rolls along and I go to update my new iPad to the biggest iOS release ever and I see:

ios-8-installation-requirement

 

When did 16 G get to be so small? Realizing 16G is small is about the same thing as realizing that I may need reading glasses or longer arms. This is not a happy moment.

And. It. Gets. Worse.

This is the complaining part of the post, you’ve been warned. It took me bits and pieces of a perfectly good Saturday to update my devices. After pleading with the Apple store people to let me exchange for a 32G, I had to figure out how to update my 16G phone.

How to Install iOS8 on your teeny-tiny-eensie-weensie 16G iOS device OTA.

OTA = Over the air.

Step 1: Backup your iDevice Settings>iCloud>Backup to iCloud

Step 2: Reset your device to factory settings Settings>General>Reset>Erase All Content and Settings

Step 3: Set up your iPad as if new (do not back up from iCloud) and Install iOS8 Settings>General>Software Update>Download (let it download for 30 mins – 1hour)> Install

Step 4: Reset your device to factory settings *Again* Settings>General>Reset>Erase All Content and Settings

Step 5: Set up your iPad as if new and restore from iCloud backup

Why the tedious process?

Well, iOS8, if you haven’t heard is a *big* update. It takes over 5G to install, but once installed only requires about 1G. It’s like an incredible-shrinking-iOS. It’s acting a bit like Alice might.

alice04aalice06a

What this means for my classroom.

This is my third year of running a one to one iPad program. Each student in my class has an iPad assigned to them for the year. They do not take them home, but they access the device throughout the day. I speculated that I would get 5 good years out of the devices before I would no longer be 1:1. I expected that some would be damaged so I wouldn’t have the ratio. Or, I expected that after 5 years I would no longer be able to update to the new operating system. Like a hole in your favourite sweater, I expected things would unravel from there. Old technology doesn’t feel cozy like ripped jeans. Old tech feels heavy and cumbersome like storing a friend’s furniture or pet sitting for your parents. Old tech isn’t terrible, it’s just that it starts getting in the way instead of enabling. Five years. I thought I would have 5 years to deploy and innovate. But, I feel like for two I have deployed and wrestled with the devices and now at the beginning of year 3 it’s going to take a massive amount of work to update 23 devices and the new 23 I just purchased. And what happens next year when iOS9 comes out? I suspect that I will not be able to update the 23 iPad (iPad 3, 30 pin). And then, how long after that will the devices still be powerful? How long after that will they feel like an enhancement instead of a burden? Will future version of Apps I love be backwards compatible?

Update:  Maybe it’s not all that bad.  Greg Garner suggests:

“Plug one into an Apple computer and back up to computer choosing “download only” for the update. Once backed up, update the iOS. For each subsequent device: plug in, back up, click update. It won’t need to re-download the OS, since it is already on your computer.”

Am I telling you not to buy iPad tablets? No, that is not the point.

I still think iPad is the best tablet. This is not an Apple problem, this is a problem for every tablet. Actually, I suspect iPad and Apple devices will have the longest life of any of the tablets out there. I do know that Apple products are the most eco-friendly and environmentally conscious technology products available. I promise the same will happen with other tablets too, even less expensive tablets that have an operating system that largely based online.

The solution

The solution is not to stop buying iPad devices, or to stop buying tablets altogether. That would be like Alice leaving Wonderland before she had an adventure and learned the true meaning of her life and place in the world. No, we who have jumped down the rabbit hole don’t get to jump right out. And, AND, we must continue to encourage others to jump down into edtech with us to make sense of this mess. Teachers especially have to be engaged. If not, powerful companies and uninformed district personnel will decide our tech fate for us.

The solution is to, more than ever before, really honestly drink from the cup of pedagogy-before-technology. We must push ourselves to be more than our devices. We must push the technology to it’s edge, to the point where it will break and then go one step further. Then, we must write honestly and openly and publicly about our trials and tribulations.

Anyone who is writing about how Edtech is easy is lying. They are (or should I say “we are”) not lying in the sense of telling untruths, but the simplicity of the message is a lie by omission. And, it’s not helping anyone.

Womyn goes to bed. Decides to post without editing. Why bother checking my post over for spelling? (I hear your collective gasp you English teachers who actually read entire blog posts).  Predictive text should be better soon, editing is so iOS7.

Michelle

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6 responses to iOS 8 is a bit of a bummer.

  1. Lol, nice read.

    Personally, I don’t understand why everyone is always in such a rush to update! Leave it till summer. That’s what we do. My co-coach always updates everything as soon as it’s available, and then I always laugh at him when he starts hitting all the problems:) He always goes “Yeah, yeah, I know, I shouldn’t have updated, but there’s this great new feature….:

    • Not updating feels like trying to opt out of a feature on a roller coaster ride. Once you are on, you are on. Perhaps I need to think more critically about this? Could be.

      Thanks for your comments and readership.

  2. Love this post.
    Thank you for once again bringing forward the practical prices of pedagogy before technology. The release of iOS 8 proved this truism.
    Will you let us know your struggles with updating/not updating your iPads?

    • Thanks, Rodney. Yes, I will do a follow up. At this point, the local Apple people have jumped up and are doing what they can to help. Both the Ontario sales rep and tech specialist have been in touch to offer support. I am amazed by their willingness to listen and help problem solve. It’s outstanding. Looks like a sync tray may help slightly. Thanks for your kind words and interest.

  3. Really appreciate where you got to with your reflections in this post: “drink from the cup of pedagogy-before-technology”. It is so true. When the focus is the tech, updates, crashes, and slow wifi get us down. When the focus is great teaching (which I believe involves great connections and relationships), tech hiccups become minor. I love how you live that out! Keep up your great influence on your little ones and the teachers around you!

    • Thanks, Sean. It took me an entire blog post and much fretting to re-learn that might pedagogy first lesson. It’s funny how you have to relearn things. You might know something academically, but then something reminds you of it on a deeper level. Thanks for reading and for your comments.

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